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red vs. red. congress vs. the white house and when it came to foreign policy, whether and how to intervene. we begin, of course, with election 2012. >> thank you, new hampshire. tonight we made history. he is the worst republican in the country to put up against barack obama. >> if you've got a business, you didn't build that. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans and to heal the planets. my promise is to help you and your family. >> when you pick up that ballot to vote, you will face the clearest choice of any time in a generation. >> there are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. 47% who are with him. >> i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory. >> and whether i earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you. and you've made me a better president. >> when a president is seeking a second term voters have clear options, stay the course or throw the bum out. so what 2012, karen in the end, was it a referendum or a choice? that's the question that we kept having. >>
nixon will late year it to describe this foreign policy in the way that caufield describes him in the which isache novel, catcher in the rye, which documents a progression towards a nervous breakdown. richard nixon is undergoing a nervous breakdown during the story, thinking of himself in that sense of being mad, and all the connotations that term had, and he knows he is on the cusp of either making or breaking his national political career, the moment he rescues his career from that moment onwards. real noir feeling to the book. he is a nnoirish character and i wanted to tell a spence -- suspense story. there's a very tight internal structure the book. at it kind of a slice of history, looking at a moment. it starts with nixon's rise to national popularity, being put on the ticket during the spring of 1952. follows the conventions of the summer. these convention one of the hat set of conventions where things were actually determined at conventions. television is starting to take over conventions but there's actual serious decision making, and i go into the scandal in september
of new style of conservative visioning of foreign-policy that i will explain. directly related to that, there is an enormous divide within the republican party in 1952. that shouldn't surprise any of us. this has always been a very divided party but the tension within the republican party that speech in the election are very important. the third thing that i think is perhaps most important is the american tradition of populism and what richard nixon is doing to the populace tradition throughout the election. the fourth and final thing is the kind of -- the subtitle of the book is about the rocking socking election in 1952 and that is nixon's conception of how politics should be. should be about being tough and i think that has a long ranging impact on the way we think about politics today. let me just go through these four issues briefly and kind of elaborate on each bit. with the cold war, there is an obvious background that's going on throughout the book and the obvious thing that is happening is that we are in the midst of the korean war. the korean war is a war that by this point i
on this, i think i'm a little to her left on a lot of thers foreign policy issues like iraq and the middle east. she's positioned herself just where you want to be, a notch or two to the right of obama on foreign policy, vis-a-vis netanyahu. she never took back her support for the iraq war. it seems to me she's notched pretty close to the model there politically, a good place to run against any republican. >> let's see about that because by that teary if you go all the way back to when the kts first made it to the national stage, bill clinton should have been the favorite of the republicans at the brought the democratic party away from the left and into the middle. instead, of course, you had the bill clinton years were just like the obama years. >> you see this happening again? swrooim saying they're going to find something. it's not always logical, not always about it's this issue -- >> let's get back to the visceral part. not just we're going to run against her because she could potentially be the democratic standard bearer but are we going to hate her? i agree with you -- rana this is
, speeches, which constit--constitute strong policy documents on the economy, on foreign policy, during the presidency, before the presidency and during the 1980 presidential campaign. some of that's in the book as well. c-span: by the way, i have one question. it does--you didn't cover it in any of the intros or anything. where are the tapes of the radio addresses? >> guest: that's a great question, and we have the tape here today. they're at the hoover institution archives. and this project could not have happened without both archives. the radio broadcasts, the handwritten versions, and all of the private papers are at the reagan library, although they are not controlled by the library. there's not a deed of gift. they are controlled by the reagans. they're private papers that happen to be housed there. so that's one place where reagan material is. the second place is the hoover institution, which controls the tapes. it was able to get hold of the tapes. harry o'connor was the producer of reagan's radio broadcasts. in fact, he was in hollywood at the time, in the '70s, and suggested
. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. (instrumental music) >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring america's to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, sacred cow: defending america on a budget. (instrumental music) (marching music) >> the u.s. spent the last century fighting well-defined wars against well-heeled enemies. ♪ stop! >> duck and cover up under the table. first you duck and then you cover. >> but the fall of the berlin wall meant the collapse of the traditional enemy and the military struggled to find its purpose in this post soviet world. >> we have to understand the role that the united states has played since the end of the second world war and
about this. has the american foreign policy changed all since the cold war ended? >> it's been over for more than 20 years now. and is the u.s. still seemed to be cracked open? >> i want to hear you talk about it because -- >> i'm not a historian to be i cannot this from the outside that it's such a heartbreaker. there is a season of peace in the late 80's with reagan and the garbage of reaching some agreement on the nuclear arms and then when push comes into office in january of course dukakis was my choice and he was leading in the race but the it as it may she has a golden opportunity. truman -- truly stalin moment. gorbachev is offering as you said an oyster so the typical of the troops on a figure up and they can have their germany as long as nato doesn't go further. these kind of things are in the air and what does bush to? trademark and square happens and he suspends relations but behind the scenes to beat he does business as usual. he goes into panama in december of '89. i will never forget that because fourth of july was opening on that same day and the american people love
at princeton, the evening before alger hiss was scheduled to speak at the university about u.s. foreign policy. alger hiss on foreign policy. here are some of the things edwards said to the assembled stewards, quote, you will be observing, as adroit and charming personality as i have witnessed in 30 years of experience, quote, you will find it difficult to believe that you are listening to a man convicted by a jury of willful perjury to conceal his role as a traitor and a spy. and alger hiss indignantly denied chambers's allegations that he was the communist, i have never witnessed a more convincing display of righteous laugh, and swore he never laid eyes and whitaker chambers. he blinked at a photograph of chambers. less than a month later, confronted with chambers' himself, was to confess that he had indeed known the man and knew him intimately and given him an automobile. out for his was not embarrassed. the picture of injured innocence, failed to recall man whose appearance is that of the man in the photograph shown him. this explained that he had known chambers but under another name, tha
just led him right into the track and that was very harmful. it basically took foreign policy off the table. it made it seem like, in the third debate, romney barely showed up because he had basically seeded all of foreign policy to the president. that's what the polls were showing. it's something you very rarely see in a debate, chris, which is a clean kill. two or three other examples. this is a perfect one where romney was very well-prepared and taken by his staff to a place that he shouldn't have been, where he's trying to score points on an issue where he shouldn't have been trying to score. romney said obama did fot use that words. the moderator actually stepped in at the time and fact-checked him and said you're wrong. and that was just so devastating. >> yeah, well said. it was critical. he's right, john. twitter sbantly went wild. it's the number two line of the year. let's take a listen. >> we took a concerted efrlt to go out and find women who had backgrounds who could find members of our cabinet. >> so what was the quote of the year? this probably won't shock you. in s
politically? would you put her where i put her on foreign policy to the right of obama? rana? >> i would. >> and safer politically for an election in a general election given the fact people normally want to switch parties every eight years. you don't want to run as a xerox of obama. your thoughts. >> i do think she's to the right on foreign policy. i think what's going to be really interesting is seeing where she is economically. she's been very savvy about using economic statecraft to advance foreign policy goals for the u.s. it will be interesting to see what she brings to the economic debate because i think that's still going to be a debate in the next election. jobs. how to grow, how to get the country back on track. it will be really interesting to see where it comes off. >> i have you as a feminist, everybody is a feminist right now. it's a good position to be in politically. do you think she will have an unusually high draw among women voters? and that's maybe a dumb question, but could she get up to 65% or 70% of the women voters as opposed to 55%. >> that would be a high number
was scheduled to speak at the university about u.s. foreign policy. alger hiss on foreign policy. what else can one say about princeton's invocation but once politically correct, always politically correct. here are some of the things edwards said to the assembled students, quote, you will be observing as brilliant, as an adroit commack as charming personality as i have witnessed in more than 30, as charming pe as i have witnessed in more than 30 years of newspaper experience. he was convicted by a jury of willful perjury to conceal his role as a traitor and a spy. edwards recalled that in his first appearance before the house committee on american activities, alger hiss in dignity -- indignantly denied allegations that he would communist, quote, i never witnessed a more convincing display of righteous wrath, my father said, as alger hiss swore he never laid eyes on whitaker chambers. he blinked at a photograph of chambers in utter amazement. less than a month later alger hiss confronted with chambers' himself was to confess that he had indeed been known to man and known him intimately and even
addition what foreign policy do you think you should have? what would you do? >> with compassion and a love of mankind with the global purpose. the century of the common man seems to be paramount because we have more knowledge. the world can cooperate and i think globalization is not us with the bigger shirk but cooperating. that is the century i want to live bin. >> 300 people have more wealth than 300 million and the wal-mart shares are richest and the top 1 percent have more wealth than the bottom 90 percent we need to redistribute resources. >> they say you cannot live like that. there is always the bad guy. now is the chinese. it is an old argument we become the bad guy because nobody yaks worse than we do. >> we have the power and ironically it was our space that now devolves into the space electronic shield, a triple canopy by 2025, we could become a fascist force for control. we are. like "star wars" and george lucas. will we follow our heart or follow the base instincts? >> host: think you. >> host: john jackson, jr. professor of africana studies at it ever since pennsylvania and a
things that happens while kennedy is alive that has a very important impact on foreign policy is the assassination of the president of south vietnam. our client, our ally over there. and then two weeks later, i think it's two weeks later, kennedy is himself assassinated. and as you were saying before, this raised the questions that historians can argue about, keep arguing about, the next 50 years, would kennedy have wanted to -- would he have pulled american troops out of vietnam dish pull adviseers out, and you -- indications are that he would have and you cite various sources.that. just curious, just to challenge that a little bit, there's a wonderful book by a diploma called, "choosing war" in which he says that viet cong attacks were doubling in november from the month above in south vietnam. and that there were meetings of kennedy's top advicers in honolulu, which is -- which i think finished up the day before kennedy was assassinated -- a great film -- and they warn the viet cong is going to win if the u.s. didn't do something very quickly. so, not to challenge the memor
glasser one of the nations top national security journalist. susan is the editor-in-chief of foreign-policy magazine has done tremendous work in billing foreign-policy.com into a key locus of the nationals carry discussion. prior to joining foreign-policy susan was reported to "the washington post" and the capitol hill newspaper roll call and brings great experience and expertise to the conversation tonight. runtime and susan were poised for an intriguing conversation about leadership generalship command and relief, tom and susan. >> for so thank you so much for that kind introduction and thank you to c&s who is not only been a benefactor to tom but directly and indirectly foreign-policy as we embarked on this project over the last two years. thank you very much and i think you have given us a perfect starting point for the conversation today in your very generous and right on the mark introduction of tom and the book so -- i too have known tom not only as editor and a friend but as they just dropped a thinker who has lots of important things to say about leadership, followership in the n
and taking credit for it. two, any success in terms of any foreign policy in the middle east. >> the president said al-qaeda had been decimated. that was his foreign policy statement. on 9/11 there was a terrorist attack and u.s. ambassador in libya was killed. guess what? the media jumped on romney and said this is political. >> it was political. >> it changed from the obama campaign first. >> the attack that took place in libya what was going on in egypt and elsewhere where did video did prompt the attack. >> mitt romney said the obama campaign is not portraying this in the proper light. they have a weak response. guess what? we found out from that clip right there. the president didn't believe it was a terrorist attack on 9/11. >> i think you are hanging on a word, terrorists, extremists you. >> i think the president meant it was not a terrorist attack because they were watching the realtime attack happening. juan, you are repeating the spin tunisia and egypt and libya. they are separate. you have been putting a sequence within libya, too. >> lib with a comes after those a
and his minister also devote energy to foreign policy. he says they will strengthen diplomatic and security policies. >> translator: we should rebuild our diplomacy to protect our national interests. we are facing many challenges in our relations with china, south korea and even with the united states on which japan's security is based. strengthening japan/ize lie yans is the first step toward rebuilding japan's diplomacy and security. >> abe promised the central government will take the lead in rebuilding disaster-hit regions in northeastern japan, especially fukushima prefecture, home to the damaged nuclear plant. the new prime minister says he will achieve results as soon as possible to redeem the trust of the japanese people. >>> prime minister abe's launched his cabinet tuesday after the top lawmakers elected him to the top job. both houses of parliament elected abe as prime minister, a post he held between 2006 and 2007. abe is the first politician in 64 years to return to the position after resigning. his liberal democrats ruled japan almost continuously for half a centu
and up' worried a foreign policy cliff and not merely the little fiscal cliff we have to deal with january 1. >> chris: panel, we have to take a break here. we we come back, our panel dusts off the crystal ball and gives us their predictions for 2013. share everything. share brotherly love. share one up's. mom ? mom ? the share everything plan. lets your family share a pool of data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a sptrum 2 by lg for $49.99 for their annual football trip. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their ddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. but with the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any flight, anytime. the scoreboard doesn't lie. what's in your wallet? hut! i have me on my fantasy team. >> chris: we a year end tradition around here to have the panel make some predictions for the new year on a range of topics but given our track records in the area i would not rush to las vegas to place any bets, folks. start with something we are s
cliff and monetary cliff, and i'm worried a foreign policy cliff and not merely the little, you know, fiscal cliff we have to deal with january 1st. >> chris: all right, panel we have to take a breake here, whe we come back the panel dusts off the crystal ball and gives us their predictions for 2013. ♪ ♪ >> chris: check out fox news sunday.com, for behind-the-scenes features, panel-plus, and, our special monday preview of the week ahead. you can find it at foxnewssunday.com and be sure and let us know what you think. stay tuned, for more from o [ female announcer ] now get high speed internet at home on our newly expanded advanced digital network, a connection you can count on. introducing at&t u-verse high speed internet with more speed options, reliability and wi-fi hot spots than ever. go to our website below to get u-verse high speed internet for just 14.95 a month for 12 months with a one-year price guarantee. it's all the speed you need all at a great price. our newly expanded advanced digital network gives you more of what you enjoy online. and with at&t, our wireless gate
and in iran nuclear program continues to progress. look at the foreign policy challenges facing the united states in 2013. because youry wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ >> from iran's nuclear ambition toss china's nationalist im
japan's foreign policy. >> translator: we should rebuild our diplomacy to protect our national interests. we are facing many challenges in our relations with china, south can korea and even the united states on which japan's security is based. strengthening u.s./japan alliance is the first step towards rebuilding japan's diplomacy and security. >> abe promised his government would take the lead in rebuilding northeastern japan. he will achieve results as soon as possible to regain the trust of the japanese people. he said his cabinet is designed to overcome crisis. he was elected as prime minister, a post he held before between 2006 and 2007. he's the first politician in 64 years to return to the position after resigning. abe filled the cabinet with familiar faces and new ones. he appointed suga as chief cabinet secretary. that makes him the head government spokesperson. aso is his deputy. he will serve as finance minister and financial services minister. the new foreign minister is fumio kishida. he served in the previous cabinet. onodera is defense minister. he's well versed in dip ro
. on foreign policy, he emphasized the importance of japan posting relationship with united states. relationship with united states. >> i spoke to president obama on the telephone the other day. we have agreed to work to rebuild our relationship. i acknowledge before stepping reinforcing our relations with the u.s. is our priority. as prime minister, i must protect our citizens lives with determination. right now, are fearful -- airforce are protecting our sea and sky around the island. japan's security is not someone else's program. it is the crisis we have on our hands. >> this is "bbc world news." mohamad morsi has welcomed the vote in favor of a new constitution and he has called on those who opposed it to join in a national dialogue. another army massacre in syria as another person the facts. seeing the army has deviated from protecting the nation. a fire has destroyed a fireworks or house in nigeria. it killed at least one person and injured many more. it quickly spread to other buildings. he sent us this report. >> it was felt miles away and a thick cloud of smoke rose from
to get political advantage. >> all right, a look at war and foreign policy in 2012. >> this time of war began in afghanistan, and this is where it will end. >> afghanistan is now the nation's longest war. more than two dozen americans have died in fighting it. in 2012, the president promised that the end was in sight. what did our brave young men and women in uniform achieve in afghanistan in the year 2012? >> we lost a lot. we lost a lot. we can say that they did find and they did get osama bin laden, but they are paying a terrible price. >> was the idea to get rid of al qaeda? and now they are fighting the taliban? how long does this go on? what is the rationale? >> i think the rationale disappeared years ago. i think obama had an opportunity when he came in office to make the decision, and he went for a replay of the surge in iraq, which succeeded in iraq, but he did not give -- i am not sure weather it would have had any chance, but he supplied a number of troops much lower than with the commanders had asked for. it was supposed to be a sequential operation. the south and in the eas
said his cabinet has a mission to put the economy, education and foreign policy back on a recovery track. abe said his government's most pressing challenge is to swiftly bring the country out of deflation and to lower the yen against the dollar. he also talked about his visit on saturday to the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. abe said his government will allocate funds for the disaster-hit areas as quickly as possible. he said he will tighten control of japan's remote islands and strengthen defense of them. chinese ships and aircraft have repeatedly entered japanese waters and air space around the senkaku islands in the east china sea last year. there's one challenge the prime minister won't be able to tackle any time soon. japan's ageing and shrinking population. new government figures show the number of people coming of age in 2012 matched the record low set the year before. people in japan can vote, drink and smoke when they turn 20. a survey by the internal affairs ministry found 1.22 million japanese reached the milestone in 2012. that's the same figure as a year earlie
, you know, obama's foreign policy. >> ambassador there, have you a contributions of cbs, time magazine, nbc and "new york times". >> and part of the problem is disconnect tweechb elite status. no one they are killed it's big news. and in the middle of a presidential campaign, you bet they expect two candidates who are vying to be commander in chief to talk about why americans are being killed and nothing is being done about it. >> and by the way, the elite main stream immediate why never gave the rez benefit of the doubt when it came to national security issue that's got concrete. they political sized iraq and afghanistan. this is a disgrace with personal representative of the president of the united states, dead in the street dragged through the streets. these are foreign policy it doesn't matter. >> you know, there are a lot of sicking points to this. they requested security. beforehand. numerous occasions seek ti denied they knew what's happening in realtime. they never told the american people. then, there is a cover up as suspect aspect of this. all to protect the president so he
these jobs, foreign policy is my passion, and yet actually i'm also a mother and i want to be at home for the last five years that my children are at home and it was hard for me to admit that to myself. but in the end i had to recognize both as a matter of need and want that my life was going to go in a different direction than i had always expected it would, and i had to listen to that and i had to in the end kind of say, wow, maybe i'm not quite the same person i thought i was, but i know this is the right thing for me to do. >> what was the most difficult part of your job in relation to balancing it with your role as a mother? >> it was just that sense so often where, you know, particularly my oldest son really needed me home, needed us both there, and i was in another place. and i could not do anything about that. you know, i think that is true for millions of parents and certainly millions of women, and i realized the stress was just overwhelming of knowing that i had a child who really did need me and i couldn't respond. i couldn't live up to that responsibility. >> after you ca
and jewish statements. is he too liberal on foreign policy for republicans or just too close to obama? well, we're going to tell you why the hagel fight matters, even if he becomes another causality of washington's angry nomination process. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ...could end with adding a close friend. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> i think all 100 senators ought to be on the line on this. what do you believe? what are you willing to support? what do you think? why are you elected, because you wanted a safe job? go sell shoes. this is a tough business. but is it any tougher, us having to take a tough vote, express ourselves, and have the courage to step up than what we're asking our young men and women to do? i don't think so. >> by opposing george w. bush's iraq surge in 2007, chuck hagel endeared himself to anti-war democrats but lost a lot of republican support. now while president obama's next potential secretary of defense is being hailed by some precisely because h
not only did it take benghazi off the table, it basically took foreign policy off the table. it seemed like in the third debate that romney barely showed up because he had basically ceded all of foreign policy to the president. that's what the polls were showing. but also, it's something that you very rarely see in a debate, chris, which is a clean kill. you've got lloyd benson doing it to dan quayle. two or three other examples in the entire history of presidential debates. and this was the perfect one where romney was very well prepared on many other issues, was taken by his staff to a place that he shouldn't have been, where he is trying to score points on an issue where he shouldn't have been trying to score. >> i could just add to this. >> go ahead, what made that so effective is he wasn't even the one who delivered the sort of kill line. it was candy crowley, the moderator of the debate. because of what romney said is that obama did not use those words was so demonstratebly false that the moderator stepped in at the time and fact checked him and said you're wrong. that was so devastat
in the obama white house was these are republicans. on foreign policy, he's been way to the left of president obama. >>> former nebraska senator chuck hagel has been leaked not nominated leaked as a potential nominee for secretary of defense, and there was already a massive counter offensive against him. it does have more substance to it, than the attacks against susan rice. a fair amount of that substance consists of insinuations. the sides are forming, there's the chuck hagel defense corps and the club of very tree ole and assault. what is not happening is sitting back and asking the simple question, would this person make a better defense secretary than the alternatives who are the other people up for the job. would one of them be better? the front-runners for secretary of defense are chuck hagel. there's also michelle florinoid, who is well qualified. also in the running is ashton carter, the current deputy defense secretary. now, defense isn't my issue, but i'd like to know, which of these people would do the best job. we keep skipping the interview process, going right to the smearing p
it was all about. it was really a big deal. we forget that in american foreign policy until the fall of the soviet union the entire focus was basically the soviet union and communism and things that emanated from it. the intelligence community, the counterintelligence community was focused on communism. as the conservative movement grew into the 60s and 70s continually communism was the focus. as i mentioned there were other strands of it, the libertarians are economic conservatives, some of whom were critical of the anti communists because they thought it meant it would increase the size of government but nevertheless they were second stringers if you will. haty hatyek, contemporaries of chambers and russell kirk, one represented the other two strands but until the 70s probably communism was the dominant thing. something i have wondered about is when ronald reagan was elected, as you look at the history of the conservative movement anti communism became less of a deal and with ronald reagan the people who were anti-communist felt they had an anticommunist in charge who was commander
the preoccupation of the committee and a preoccupation of the foreign policy and those concerned with foreign policy nationwide. why now? partly because this time we lost an ambassador and a great man. but mostly, it's because now benghazi isn't just a loss of diplomats, we have lost some before, but now there is a partisan advantage to be sought by one side or the other . this incident was an important, but is it more important than the north korean nuclear program? is it more important than the other subjects that haven't been the subject of so many hearings of this committee? we have now decided to focus on the politics security in part because we can blame one party or the other. we can blame the state department for not allocating its resources to diplomatic security or blame the republican congress for not appropriating the enough. we should do more for diplomatic security. this department should follow its own procedures, and we have not done so. we would like to believe in the world that is subject somehow to our control, that if we just do the right thing everything will turn out right. thi
of the 20th-century would bring as a major financial crisis and gulf was a foreign policy that would overextend us and undermine our national security. the government would have had to change in monetary system, shrink in size and scope, and reduce the unsustainable cost of policing the world. the problems seem to be overwhelming and impossible to solve, yet from my viewpoint, just following the constraints placed on the federal government by the constitution would have been a good place to start. just how much did i accomplished? in many ways, according to conventional wisdom, but often on a career in congress from 1976 to 2012 accomplished very little. no name legislation, no name federal buildings or highways. the government has grown exponentially. taxes remain excessive. a prolific increase of incomprehensible regulations continues. wars are constant, and pursued without congressional declaration. deficits rise to this guy. poverty is rampant. dependency on the federal government is now worse than any time in our history. all of this with minimal concerns the deficit and unfunde
dollar. for some time now, overseas resources have been cut or withheld, and important foreign policy objectives have been starved. consider that last year we spent approximately $650 billion on our military. by contrast, the international affairs budget is less than one-tenth of the pentagon's. secretary gates has spoken about this and strongly urged the congress to address that imbalance. we have not yet. admiral mullen pointed out, the more diplomacy is cut, the more lives are lost. we have to make certain that we are not penny-wise and pound-foolish when it comes to supporting americas vital overseas interests. adequately funding foreign-policy initiatives is not spending, but investing in our long-term security, and more often or not, it saves far more expensive expenditures in dollars and lives in the conflicts that we fail to see or avoid. we need to invest in america's long-term interest in order to do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world. this report makes that crystal clear. since 1985, i have had the privilege of making official journeys to one trouble spot or another.
oppose chuck hagel are the people who have been the most wrong on foreign policy, pretty much on everything for the last generation? right? there was a piece in the national journal in which he writes for too many lawmakers on capitol hill, nominating hagel would be too uncomfortable. it would be too uncomfortable to have him restored to power because he would be a living, nagging reminder of just how much they got wroonk. >> that's certainly arguable. there's nobody who has been put up yet. before anybody is officially nominated, there's all kinds of posturing that goes on. we saw it with susan rice who was never even nominated, and they buried her as if she was nominated. what's funny to watch on the hill is all the posturing before somebody comes up. a colleague of mine talked to senator mccain, who was notoriously leading the charge to keep out susan rice. >> he has been wrong about everything, like since -- for 20 years. foreign policy-wise. >> and as he has become the face of one of the leading voices to keep occupy suesan rice, my colleague asked him about john kerry po
implications for the foreign policy and wha in what is happen the middle east, john negroponte, the first director of national intelligence appointed by george w. bush serving five times as an investor and in his distinguished career in intelligence and diplomacy. great to have you with us. >> thank you. lou: let's start with the middle east. president morsi, ordering the military to arrest civilians. what is your reaction? >> i just think it is administration of the precariousness of the situation in egypt, but that situation is critical. we can't afford to see egypt go over some kind of a brink. they are crucial to the middle east peace process. wo perhaps if egypt were to pull back from the recognition of israel, the largest arab country population in the region, therev is a critical role to play in many different ways. lou: the way his administration has engaged the muslim brotherhood, the army and egypt and what the likely result will be, are you optimistic that his diplomacy is on the correct path? >> i think it started out quite seriously, nobody knew what was going to happen when
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